Federal Fraud Crimes Attorney

Complicated criminal cases demand an experienced South Carolina federal fraud lawyer

If you are the focus of a federal fraud criminal investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or another government entity, the amount of evidence against you can be staggering. Simply knowing where to begin to defend your rights can be overwhelming.

Begin with a phone call to South Carolina federal criminal defense attorney Matt Bodman or contact us online. Attorney Bodman has years of experience handling complicated fraud cases. A former assistant state prosecutor, he understands the legal system from the inside. Such intimate knowledge of the legal system has enabled him to consistently build strong legal cases for clients since founding his own law firm in 2002.

Don't wait to take legal action if the federal government has charged you with fraud or another similar charge. Call or email us today.

What are common federal fraud charges?

Some of the most common - and often complicated - federal fraud cases we handle at our law firm include:

Federal fraud cases should never be taken lightly. If you are found guilty, you will likely be sentenced to months or years in a federal prison and fined thousands of dollars.

Bank Fraud

Bank fraud often involves illegally obtaining money or other assets from a bank or another financial institution. Unlike a bank robbery that might involve a threat to harm someone, most bank fraud cases are non-violent crimes. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) investigates most federal bank fraud charges, including:

  • Check theft
  • Misuse of checks
  • Embezzlement
  • Identity theft
  • Internet banking fraud
  • Illegal bank wire transfers
  • Fraudulently opening a bank account with fake documents

If you are found guilty of bank fraud, you could be fined up to $1,000,000 or sentenced to up to 30 years in prison. When your freedom and reputation is at stake, you need an experienced South Carolina bank fraud defense lawyer who understands federal banking laws on your side, working for you every step of the way.

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Wire Fraud

This form of fraud generally involves someone accused of using a telephone or the Internet to defraud another person and obtain money or an item of value through illegal means. In the past, illegal telemarketing schemes that included false promises or deceptive practices were a common form of wire fraud. In recent years, accusations of Internet fraud and other cyber crimes have become increasingly common.

The FBI investigates most wire fraud charges. State and local agencies also sometimes participate in such investigations, which can be complex and produce a tremendous amount of evidence against the accused.

The penalties for wire fraud vary. In most cases, a wire fraud conviction will result in sizable fines and up to 20 years in a federal prison. Attorney Bodman is well-versed in the federal wire fraud laws and has handled many cases in South Carolina throughout his career. Talk to us before making a statement to law enforcement officials about your charges. You might have more legal options available to you than you realize.

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Forgery and Counterfeiting

The U.S. Secret Service doesn't only protect the president; the agency has jurisdiction over investigations into counterfeiting of U.S. currency. But forgery and counterfeiting crimes can extend beyond the illegal reproduction of money. Other reasons why people are charged with forgery or counterfeiting include:

  • Trademark infringement - Often includes the production of fraudulent products (including fake designer products)
  • Trafficking in counterfeit goods - The sale and distribution of fraudulent products across state lines is a federal crime
  • Forged documents - The creation of fake documents like driver's licenses, birth certificates and passports, particular to commit a crime,
  • Counterfeit securities - These can include fake stocks or bonds
  • Other examples of counterfeit items include:
    • Fraudulent court records
    • Illegally altered land titles

If found guilty, a federal counterfeiting conviction can result in a fine of up to $250,000 and a sentence to up to 20 years in prison in many instances. In other cases, the penalties can be as much as 25 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

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Money Laundering

This form of fraud involves someone accused of attempting to conceal the source of illegally obtained money. An important distinction with this crime is the government must prove that the person attempted to conceal the source of such funds and make it appear that the money was made or obtained through legal means.

Several government agencies investigate money-laundering charges. These include:

  • Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
  • S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
  • Financial Action Task Force (FATF)

Money laundering convictions often result in significant prison sentences (1 to 35 years), fines (several thousand dollars to $500,000) and probation.

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RICO Crimes

RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act) is a federal law created to target organized groups that run allegedly illegal businesses. This law also targets groups of people that attempt to embezzle money obtained illegally through legitimate business, a sophisticated form of money laundering.

Many people associate RICO crimes with organized crime groups like the mafia. But RICO charges can involve alleged organized crime organizations involved prostitution, drug trafficking or counterfeit goods.

In most instances, the FBI investigates RICO charges. If you are found guilty, you could be sentenced to 20 years in prison and fined $250,000 for each RICO charge. Talk to an experienced South Carolina RICO criminal defense attorney today to begin mounting an effective defense.

Even if you are innocent of the RICO charges, the government typically will aggressively pursue a conviction. Without an experienced RICO attorney at your side, you may lose your freedom, even if you did nothing wrong.

Fortunately, attorney Bodman formerly worked as an assistant state prosecutor. He knows how the government prosecutes these types of complex cases. He has a comprehensive understanding of the state and federal legal system in South Carolina.

You have too much at risk to leave your future to chance. Make sure you give your case the best opportunity to succeed. Contact us and schedule an appointment at our office in downtown Columbia, S.C. We're ready and eager to work with you and set the record straight.

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